A Level Physics

GorillaPhysics

Kit Betts-Masters

Two Week Revision Plan - Get an A* in 14 Days!

You need to do better than other people.

Simply put, it's a competition, getting a high grade is about being in the top tiny percent of the country.

 

This my fourteen day plan of what you need to do to get an A* in A Level Physics.  This will take you 2 hours a day.

 

1:  Go through exam playlists paper one.  Keep a note of the methods I use to decode and to answering questions.  Also note of all the areas of the Physics that you weren't totally sure about.  Do some reading or some YouTube searching around those topics that you weren't confident with.

 

2:  Go through exam playlists paper two.  Keep a note of the methods I use to decode and to answering questions.  Also note of all the areas of the Physics that you weren't totally sure about.  Do some reading or some YouTube searching around those topics that you weren't confident with.

 

3:  Go through exam playlists paper three.  This is the general and practical paper, so is most relevant to the practicals in A Level Physics, it also has the majority of the synoptic stuff, so should be the most challenging questions, and the easiest to do better than the rest.

Keep a note of the methods I use to decode and to answering questions.  Also note of all the areas of the Physics that you weren't totally sure about.  Do some reading or some YouTube searching around those topics that you weren't confident with.

 

4:  Go and get last year's A Level Physics Papers from your exam board.  They are really well organised at http://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/past-papers/ .  Do Paper 1 under timed conditions.  Mark it.  Note any areas that you are weak on, do some reading or some YouTube searching around those topics.

 

5:  Do Paper 2 under timed conditions.  Mark it.  Note any areas that you are weak on, do some reading or some YouTube searching around those topics.

 

6:  Do Paper 3 under timed conditions.  Mark it.  Note any areas that you are weak on, do some reading or some YouTube searching around those topics.

 

7:  Go find the examiners reports for the past papers in 2017 for your syllabus.  Edexcel's are here:  https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-a-levels/physics-2015.coursematerials.html#filterQuery=Pearson-UK:Category%2FExam-materials

You may have to ask your teacher to download the AQA or OCR ones as they appear to still be on restricted access.

Go through paper 1 reading very carefully the examiner's comments and understanding the examples that they are giving which show common mistakes and examples of good work.  Pay particular attention to the examiner's tips, and remember these are not model answers, but examples of typical student responses with annotation of why they got the mark or did not get the marks.  This is when you learn to do better than the other people sitting your exams.  Keep a list of things YOU need to improve, and do some reading and YouTube searching to meet those priorities.

 

8:  Go through paper 2 reading very carefully the examiner's comments and understanding the examples that they are giving which show common mistakes and examples of good work.  Keep a list of things YOU need to improve, and do some reading and YouTube searching to meet those priorities.

 

9:  Go through paper 3 reading very carefully the examiner's comments and understanding the examples that they are giving which show common mistakes and examples of good work.  Keep a list of things YOU need to improve, and do some reading and YouTube searching to meet those priorities.

 

10:  Find the practical sheets from the exam board,

Edexcel's are here: https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-a-levels/physics-2015.coursematerials.html#filterQuery=Pearson-UK:Category%2FTeaching-and-learning-materials  (right at the end of the list).

AQA is here: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/physics/AQA-7407-7408-PHBK.PDF

OCR is here: http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/as-a-level-gce-physics-a-h156-h556-from-2015/planning-and-teaching/  but you'll need to ask your teacher to download them for you as they’re restricted access.

Go through the first half of them memorising the method, the analysis and the typical evaluative points.  Pay particular attention to the questions or notes at the end of the documents, these are points about the practicals that they will be assessing in the exam.

 

11:  Go through the first half of them memorising the method, the analysis and the typical evaluative points.  Pay particular attention to the questions or notes at the end of the documents, these are points about the practicals that they will be assessing in the exam.

 

12:  Take a full equations sheet and spend the 2 hours annotating it using your textbooks, revision guides and notes.  Add in any common derivations, when you might use each equation, any units that you are likely to forget.  Sketch key graphs, diagrams, summarise key explanations, anything you think that you are likely to forget.  The aim is to fill the equation booklet with as much of the syllabus as possible.  Keep this it should become your most looked at document as you revise, and be the last thing you look at in the minutes running up to your exam.

 

13:  Go to physicsandmathstutor.com and download some old spec papers and their markschemes, just read the context and think about what area of the spec you need to apply to this context.  In one hour only, go through each one very quickly, without actually doing the questions, just check that the content you were thinking to apply was the correct idea with the markscheme.  Find the maths skills section of the specification and check that you feel confident about all the skills in it, if there are any that you are not find some textbook examples or videos on how to do them and get your head around them.  Add them to your annotated equation sheet.

 

14:  Go back to physicsandmathstutor.com and find some exam papers from the old syllabus, or the specimen papers from the new syllabus, whatever you haven't done before.  Answer just the hardest questions from each, maybe just the last two questions of each.  Use your new annotated equation sheet to help you do this.  This will practice your synoptic ability, your ability to draw on multiple areas of the syllabus to solve problems.

 

Boom, you are ready to get an A*!